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Diagnosis

What's in a name?

I was diagnosed with Ankylosing Spondylitis in 2007. Scine then various Rheumatologists and Dr's, have offered up other Diagnosis'. Some have suggested Psoriatic Arthritis, as I was diagnosed with Psoriasis at the age of 11. (Am now 4😎. They all agree I also show signs of degenerative osteoarthritis. I have tried numerous biologics. As well as oral NSAIDS. Recently even topical NSAID, and lidocain. I continue to search for an accurate diagnosis. One Dr. Recently told me that it doesn't matter what the true diagnosis is, as all they can do is treat symptoms anyway. I fear the time will come when I need to seek disability. Is it necessary to have a "name" to my condition, both for disability and from treatment perspective? How long did it take for others to get a confirmed diagnosis? Should I even continue to try?

  1. Also - yes, if you apply for disability benefits, they will want a diagnosis. As to how long to get a diagnosis and the importance of getting a diagnosis - the average is 7 to 10 years. I will leave you with an article regarding the importance. Click the link for information - https://axialspondyloarthritis.net/diagnosis Warmly, Rebecca (Community Advocate)

    1. I agree with Rene, - Finding the correct diagnosis helps you receive the correct treatment. Receiving the correct treatment will slow down progression of this disease if you have a diagnosis of AxSpA/AS and give you a better QOL. Wishing you well. Rebecca (Community Advocate)

      1. Hi JoMax72, I’m sorry to hear that after such a long time you still don’t have the right diagnosis. For me it took 5 years and fortunately for me I did react well to biologics. Though it did take another 10 years before I got the biologics back then. I hope that soon you will receive the right diagnosis and that the treatment helps you. I can understand that after such a long time you’re starting to ask the question if you should continue. But please do, my life has changed so much for the better when I received the right treatment. Wishing you all the best. - René (community advocate).

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